World Quality Report 2014 – An Overview

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Yesterday we launched this year’s World Quality Report, produced in collaboration with HP Software.  For the second year, I have been one of the report’s co-authors together with my colleague Mark Buenen.  Between us, we analysed and interpreted the data provided to us by the external research agency based on our ‘hands-on’ in-market knowledge of what […]

Yesterday we launched this year’s World Quality Report, produced in collaboration with HP Software. 

For the second year, I have been one of the report’s co-authors together with my colleague Mark Buenen.  Between us, we analysed and interpreted the data provided to us by the external research agency based on our ‘hands-on’ in-market knowledge of what we are seeing with our customers and participating in large managed testing bids. We have also provided a commentary on what the results mean for testing and QA over the next few years.  One thing was clear to us from the outset. Testing has never been so high on the CIO’s agenda as businesses are under increased pressure to get things right first time – every time. 

Probably like me, as an end-user you can become irritated when an application doesn’t do what you expect from it or its performance is slow or unstable.  A few years ago, I’d give it a second chance.  Nowadays, it’s all too easy to switch to an alternative application or platform.  If you have teenage children of your own, you’ll have seen how they effortlessly switch between apps whether on their phone, tablet or shared device such as a computer in a place of study. As IT professionals, we will increasingly need to take account of how younger people use technology.

A colleague told me about his wife who is a primary school teacher.  At her school, the new class of infants were shown into the school’s IT room and sat in front of several rows of (newly-purchased) desktop computers.  To start with, their teacher asked them to find a certain letter on the keyboards in front of them.  To her surprise, most of the children lent over the keyboard to touch the display screen.  Several had never pressed down the keys on a keyboard.  Why would they when they have been surrounded by touch screen technology?

Testing is becoming ever more complex and specialised but in future will have to take into account a much wider range of factors – many of which might not be related to technology as we know it today. To some extent we are able to tolerate the (lack of) quality of enterprise applications under the pressure of digital transformation and time to market. It would not be a distant soon that we will expect a complex enterprise application configure, upgrade and test and run itself from one platform to another platform, just the way it happens in few mobile platforms.

WQR 2014-15 talks about budgets, structures, testing transformation, agile, test data management and test environment management.
I look forward to hearing your thoughts and feedback. (makarand.teje@capgemini.com, @makteje)
You can download a copy from here: www.worldqualityreport.com 

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