Weekly digest of week 44 2009

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This week items about peace on Facebook, social media is not only helping social activists but also authoritarian regimes and a growing digital divide between those who are not connected to the Internet and for those who are and between those who share their information online and those who are not sharing it online. How […]

This week items about peace on Facebook, social media is not only helping social activists but also authoritarian regimes and a growing digital divide between those who are not connected to the Internet and for those who are and between those who share their information online and those who are not sharing it online.

  • How Addicting is Social Media?
    Do you tweet while driving? How about on vacation, or at work? Ever
    wonder how much time others are spending tapping away on their mobile
    phone, texting a friend, checking in on Facebook, posting a tweet on
    Twitter, or using any of the many social media services? A recent
    Gadgetology study by consumer electronics shopping site, Retrevo.com
    went looking for answers on how much control social media has on
    peoples’ lives. We weren’t entirely surprised to learn how addictive
    social media has become especially among the 35 and younger crowd.
    We’re no social psychologists but it looks like a whole generation (or
    two) is at risk of spending so much time texting, checking Facebook,
    using Twitter and other mobile social media services as to risk
    becoming addicted.
  • Who’s not using the internet?
    A decade ago most of us had never used the internet – now we can’t
    imagine life without it. Actually, some of us can: there are 10 million
    people in the UK still without a connection. Are they, Tim Adams asks,
    losing out economically and culturally? Below, we ask four web
    refuseniks to go online to see how their lives would change
  • 5 New Technologies That Will Change Everything
    3D TV, HTML5, video over Wi-Fi, superfast USB, and mobile “augmented
    reality” will emerge as breakthrough technologies in the next few
    years. Here’s a preview of what they do and how they work.
  • 100 Ways You Should Be Using Facebook in Your Classroom
    Facebook isn’t just a great way for you to find old friends or learn
    about what’s happening this weekend, it is also an incredible learning
    tool. Teachers can utilize Facebook for class projects, for enhancing
    communication, and for engaging students in a manner that might not be
    entirely possible in traditional classroom settings. Read on to learn
    how you can be using Facebook in your classroom, no matter if you are a
    professor, student, working online, or showing up in person for class.
  • Tweeting Tyrants: Authoritarian Regimes and New Media
    In Authoritarian Regimes, Social Media Doesn’t Only Help Social Activists
  • Privacy is dead, and social media hold smoking gun
    Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Foursquare, Fitbit and the SenseCam give us
    a simple choice: participate or fade into a lonely obscurity.
  • Peace on Facebook
    Facebook is proud to play a part in promoting peace by building
    technology that helps people better understand each other. By enabling
    people from diverse backgrounds to easily connect and share their
    ideas, we can decrease world conflict in the short and long term.
  • Social networking and reputational risk in the workplace (PDF)
    Deloitte LLP 2009 Ethics & Workplace Survey results
  • Google’s Wave Might Find Its Real Home Inside Company Servers
    The roll-out will mean one significant thing: You can construct and run
    your own Wave servers on your own hardware, and have them link up to
    the greater Web should your Wave conversations need to include people
    from the outside world. And that means companies can use private Waves
    as a tool for intra-office conversation and, more in keeping with how
    Wave is being promoted by Google, as a collaboration tool. In
    particularly high-tech outfits, you could even imagine that company
    developers could put together specialist Wave Apps to help with
    specific tasks or to tailor Wave to the local modus operandi.
  • Reocities , rising from the ashes – RIP Geocities…
    Here lies what we could salvage from the ashes of GeoCities.  Yahoo!
    has done an amazing thing by keeping GeoCities alive for as long as
    they did, but we feel that it is a waste to leave the Internet with a
    hole of this magnitude. At a minimum, Yahoo! could have simply left
    GeoCities as a monument to the early days. Maybe close it off from
    editing and simply make it static after getting rid of the spam pages
    once and for all. Behind this minimalistic page stretches a wealth of
    Internet history. If any of it was yours and we have successfully
    recovered it, then we hope it makes you happy to see it restored. We’ve
    rebuilt the walls to the Cities and the streets where a large part of
    the early settlers of the World Wide Web used to live in. You can still
    find them where they were before, but not all of the houses have been
    rebuilt yet.

 Light reading:

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Rick Mans is a social media evangelist within Capgemini. You can follow and connect with him via Twitter or Delicious

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