This month, none of the links I&rsquo;m moved to share are traditional charts (not quite none &hellip; if you click through on all the links there&rsquo;s one line chart).<br />
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<strong><font color="#4f81bd" face="Cambria" size="4">Let&rsquo;s start with &hellip; A language tree</font></strong></h3>
I like <a href="http://www.sssscomic.com/comic.php?page=196">this representation</a> of the relationships between worldwide languages very much, in part because it&rsquo;s likely that languages have all grown up from a single start and in part because it answers for me a question about the only language apart from English which I&rsquo;ve ever studied successfully&nbsp; &ndash; and which I&rsquo;ve been frequently told resembles other languages that I&rsquo;ve not been able to see much similarity with.<br />
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<img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/en-gb/2014/11/201411_cb0_language_tree.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 298px;" /><br />
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Turns out that Hungarian, while over to the right away from almost every other language, is still on a separate branch from Estonian and Finnish.<br />
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<strong><font color="#4f81bd" face="Cambria" size="4">On to bigger things &hellip; Anniversary giant art</font></strong></h3>
This month saw a fantastic representation of statistics in London. For every British or Colonial death in WW1, a <a href="https://poppies.hrp.org.uk/buy-a-poppy/">ceramic poppy</a> was made and positioned by the Tower so that by Remembrance Day there were 888, 246 poppies filling the moat and flowing down the walls.<br />
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<img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/en-gb/2014/11/201411_cb1_poppies.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 133px;" />&nbsp;<img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/en-gb/2014/11/201411_cb2_poppies.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 131px;" /><br />
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Meantime, over in Germany, Berlin also marked a significant anniversary with a city-wide data visualisation project.&nbsp; The <a href="http://lichtgrenze.de/">LICHTGRENZE</a> (border of lights) was an installation of 8000 lights marking the 15km route which, until 25 years ago, marked the divide between East and West.<br />
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<img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/en-gb/2014/11/201411_cb3_lichtgrenze.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 133px;" />&nbsp;<img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/en-gb/2014/11/201411_cb4_lichtgrenze.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 133px;" /><br />
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<strong><font color="#4f81bd" face="Cambria" size="4">And popular things &hellip; Colleague recommendations</font></strong></h3>
At work, owing to my obvious interest in data visualisation, I often get recommendations from colleagues and there&rsquo;s no recommendation more frequent than <a href="http://www.davidmccandless.com/">David McCandlish&rsquo;s</a> book &ldquo;<a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0007492898/thegooddrugsg-21">In… is Beautiful</a>&rdquo;, which was published in time for Christmas two years ago. The first time I saw an actual hard copy was when a client I was working with brought one into the office last year and I spent the day distracted by its data viz creativity.<br />
Anyway, as I mentioned last month, the sequel, &ldquo;<a href="http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/2014/knowledge-is-beautiful/">Know… is Beautiful</a>&rdquo;, is now out &ndash; and this time I&rsquo;ve ordered a copy for myself.<br />
I say all this because a couple of weeks ago, within the space of about three hours, several colleagues all sent me a link to a web page filled with fabulously designed maps of London. 12 of them, showing ethnicity, rent, luminance, lost property &hellip;. , taken from <a href="http://theinformationcapital.com/">a book</a> put together by <a href="http://theinformationcapital.com/james-cheshire/">James Cheshire</a> and <a href="http://theinformationcapital.com/oliver-uberti/">Oliver Uberti</a>, who combine geography and design to display London as the &ldquo;Information Capital&rdquo;. If the <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-29915801">12 charts</a> demonstrated by the BBC and <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2014/oct/28/london-life-mapped… 6</a> displayed on the Guardian data-blog are anything to go by, then this is a book that will bring delight to the souls of any Londoner with an interest in data visualisation.<br />