Is the digital door open for the long-term unemployed?

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From Mexico to Slovakia, and from the UK to Australia, governments across the world are looking for ways to tackle the issue of unemployment and employability. However, legacy processes and technology can prove a barrier to getting people back to work. A lack of integration between channels and multiple agencies providing different types of support […]

From Mexico to Slovakia, and from the UK to Australia, governments across the world are looking for ways to tackle the issue of unemployment and employability. However, legacy processes and technology can prove a barrier to getting people back to work.

A lack of integration between channels and multiple agencies providing different types of support make claiming unemployment welfare benefit confusing and, for some, impossible. But it’s not all bad news. Some countries are ahead of the game. Their welfare and employment agencies have seized the opportunity to transform their operations through IT and process re-design.

Who is doing well? And which countries need to get their acts together? The recently published Capgemini and Oracle World Jobseeking Report 2012 shares examples of best (and not so good) practice.

It identifies common challenges, notably the high levels of young people out of work and the specific issues facing long-term unemployed people. For example, while smart, digital solutions may be the answer to keeping unemployed people up-to-date with available job opportunities, do the longer-term unemployed actually have access to these systems? If not, how can they be helped back into work?

In the Netherlands, a multi-channel approach is helping to answer this question. The Dutch Government has made the use of digital services for jobseekers mandatory in the first three months of unemployment. After this time, those who are struggling with online services move to a face-to-face model.

In the UK, the introduction of Universal Credit is set to be a game changer. It aims to simplify the benefits landscape and improve the provision of benefits. And a new Universal JobMatch service allows jobseekers to match their CV and skills to jobs posted online.

These are just two of the examples of how different countries are working to cut their welfare budgets by getting more people back to work.

Find out more in the Capgemini and Oracle World Jobseeking Report 2012.
Download the report
View the Capgemini animation

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