Can GDPR be a springboard?

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Turning GDPR into a springboard means letting it drive a customer-first mindset and building more interactive, trusted relationships with the people who are providing their crucial data to your organization.

In our first blog post of this series, we tackled two important GDPR questions; how exposed is your organization and how much time, data, and talent do you have? We suggested that a unified data governance to manage both European and non-European data is preferable as it focuses on the interactions your organization wants to have with your end-users or customers.

Which leads us to our final question of how you can use GDPR to be a springboard for a better way of communicating with customers.

Our bet is that the winners coming out of the flurry of GDPR initiatives will be those organizations that treat the regulation as an opportunity to refresh their relationships with customers—rather thinking of it as a burden on the business.

For example, in the course of your program to achieve compliance, look for opportunities that arise from consolidating or linking all of the data for each individual. Can you think of new ways to connect with customers across various channels? Can, for example, the consolidated data improve your machine learning models?

More broadly, consider how the need to obtain explicit consent from users offers you an opportunity to start a conversation with those users about the products and services you’re offering.

Ask yourself these questions. Do your users see the value of providing consent regarding their data? Do they feel connected to the organization? Do they trust you to use algorithmic analysis to improve or personalize what you’re providing? Do they understand and trust the categories of consent? Can you improve trust by clarifying what you won’t do with their data? Where are the opportunities to collaborate with users?

Turning GDPR into a springboard means letting it drive a customer-first mindset and building more interactive, trusted relationships with the people who are providing their crucial data to your organization.

Where to start?

If you’re familiar at all with GDPR, you know that the consequences of noncompliance are sobering. If you already have a deep understanding of the regulation and a clear plan for facing any audit inquiries, we encourage you to share your plans and strategies with those who are struggling.

For those who still have questions, a readiness assessment could be key to identifying any gaps in your technologies and your processes.

Find out more here or reach out to our IBM-Capgemini collaboration team for more information about what an assessment can reveal.

For more information or to start a discussion, please contact either of the authors, Graham Hunt or Seth Dobrin.

Notice: Clients are responsible for ensuring their own compliance with various laws and regulations, including the European Union General Data Protection Regulation. Clients are solely responsible for obtaining advice of competent legal counsel as to the identification and interpretation of any relevant laws and regulations that may affect the clients’ business and any actions the clients may need to take to comply with such laws and regulations. The products, services, and other capabilities described herein are not suitable for all client situations and may have restricted availability. IBM does not provide legal, accounting or auditing advice or represent or warrant that its services or products will ensure that clients are in compliance with any law or regulation.

Learn more about IBM’s own GDPR readiness journey and our GDPR capabilities and offerings to support your compliance journey here.

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