Weekly digest of week 35 2009

Publish date:

This week a lot of people were discussing what the definition of Enterprise2.0 (or Enterprise Karmic Koala as Ron Tolido puts it) should be, criticism grows on Apple and the iPhone and a whitepaper (PDF) by Tim O’Reilly and John Battelle on Web squared. Social collaboration tools Visible Banking: the Social Media Directory How to […]

This week a lot of people were discussing what the definition of Enterprise2.0 (or Enterprise Karmic Koala as Ron Tolido puts it) should be, criticism grows on Apple and the iPhone and a whitepaper (PDF) by Tim O’Reilly and John Battelle on Web squared.

Social collaboration tools

Enterprise2.0

  • Annoyed at ‘Enterprise 2.0′
  • A Defining Moment
  • Enterprise 2.0 is Not an Application
    Enterprise 2.0 should be a structure that allows great flexibility in
    the choice and use of applications throughout an organization,
    supporting the applications with APIs to allow data to be taken from
    and deposited into central data stores. Enterprise 2.0 currently
    “fails” because we are attempting 1.0 deployments of 2.0 applications.
  • Enterprise 2.0: Skip the Pilot
    Get out your pitchforks, I’m about to commit Enterprise 2.0 heresy.
     There’s an orthodoxy in Enterprise 2.0 circles about how you’re
    supposed to run an implementation. The orthodoxy goes something like
    this: Start with small-scale pilots, define your business objectives,
    watch the pilots closely, evaluate their success, make a go/no-go
    decision. (A good recent articulation of this view is in Chris
    McGrath’s post on 8 Tips for a Successful Social Intranet Pilot.) As
    far as I can tell it’s what everyone thinks. In fact, it’s what I used
    to think. Unfortunately, it’s dead wrong. The orthodoxy is wrong for a
    very simple reason: Size matters. By constraining the size of your
    pilot, you significantly alter the way your company can and will use
    the tools.
  • Enterprise Karmic Koala
    When on holidays, I try to be unaware of technology as much as possible
    (people that happen to know my e-mail out-of-office messages will
    recognise this). Only natural. But not as easy as it seems. Two years
    ago, when we drove back through the French Lorraine region, we ended up
    in an ultra-modern fuel station that had literally crashed due to a
    software error. A guy in a yellow emergency vest was nervously
    searching for a Windows start-up disk while all of his screens just
    showed that all too familiar sandglass. And last year, when we cruised
    through lovely California we could not even imagine how to do it
    without TripAdvisor, Google Maps and a bunch of other on-line
    travelling tools. This year, after returning from Spain and the Alsace,
    I decided to buy a new bicycle. I found a not too expensive Gitane
    mountain bike – completely made in France, quite an unexpected pleasure
    – only to find out later that the model is called ‘Fitz Roy 2.0’.

Numbers

Web development

Is Apple losing it?

General

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Rick Mans is Information Architect and a social media evangelist within Capgemini. You can follow and connect with him via Twitter or Delicious

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